Books I ditched without finishing



2019 
  • Smart Blond, Dolly Parton. Stephan Miller. Fine, but more than I need to know about Dolly Parton.
  • Confederate in the attic, Tony Horowitz. Too depressing.
  • Ciceró, Robert Harris. Seems few women lived in Rome, and those that did were tedious
  • The Borrowed, Chan Hi-Kei, the protagonist's a know it all.
  • Do not say we have nothing, Madeline Thien. So much sorrow
  • The House of Broken Àngels, Luis Alberto Urrea. Just not interested.
  • Invisible Women, data bias in a world designed for men. Caroline Criado Pérez. Too frustrating, may pick it up again. Tbr in very all doses.
  • Flatland, Edwin A Abbott. I so wanted to love this, but it is boring and I dreaded it.
  • What the Robin Knows , Jon Young. Should be titled, 'what Brilliant I Know.' I want to read this book, but the author's ever-present arrogance is too firmly in the way. Gross.
  • Necropolis, Santiago Gamboa, Depraved and depressing
  • The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, Jonatan Evison, Unbearably Dreary
  • Native Tongue, Carl Hiassen, vicious
  • The Great Weaver from Kashmir, Halldor Laxness. Unbearably Pompous
  • Frog Music, Emma Donahue. Depressing AF. 8.19
  • Say Nothing, Patrick Radden Keefe. Nightmares after reading just a couple chapters
  • Levels of Life, Julián Barnes. The author may have won the man booker, but I'm doubting my love for that prize. Utterly without plot.
  • The Awkward Thoughts of W Kamau Bell, by same. Unfocused and uninteresting
  • This Side of Murder, Ana Lee Huber. Irritating.
  • The Hamilton Affair, Elizabeth Cobbs. I just don't care enough about US history
  • The Back Channel, a memoir of American diplomacy and the case for its renewal. Too many trees, not enough forest for this reader. .
  • The Master and Margerita. Sooooooo repetitive.
  • The Fued, Vladimir Nobokov and Edmund Wilson, the end of a beautiful friendship. Alex Beam. 1st half was fine, the just dull.
  • The Yiddish Policeman's Union. Michael Cabbon. Meh.
  • Scorpia Rising, Anthony Horowitz. These books are just so bad.
  • The Year of Reading Dangerously, Andy Miller. Loooooong winded. 
2018
  • Fascism, a warning, Madelinee Albright. Should read it, too depressing
  • The Seveneves. Neal Stevenson. Too much explanation, too little story.
  • The Happiness Curve. Jonathan Rauch. Good, but there wasn't enough for a whole book.
  • Less, Andrew Sean Greer. Dreary and dismal.
  • I am Bride, Laura Wilcocks. Just. Terrible, on so many levels.
  • Shrill. Lindy West. Shrill indeed .
  • H is for Hawk, Helen Macdonald. Beautifully written, sooooo self-absorbed.
  • A New Lease on Death, Ruth Rendall. Pedantic
  • The Glass Universe, Dava Sobel. Dull and too long. The story got lost in the detail.
  • The Line of beauty, Allan Hollinghurst. Trite.
  • The Outpost, Jake Tapper. Too dreary
  • J. M. Coetze, Disgrace. Repulsive.
  • Y is for Yesterday, Sue Grafton. Too ambiguous about sexual assault as a crime.
  • The Widows on Malabar Hill, sujata Massey. Good basic story, really annoying flashback second storyline.
  • Robert B Parker, God Save the Child. Dislikable characters, too much mysogyny and too much description
  • The Children's Book. A. S. Byatt. She usally writes a brilliant ending which redeams the dull meandering book. Today it doesn't seem worth it.
  • Ka, John Rowley. Obtusely written chase saga. After a few pages i kept finding myself playing solitaire.
  • Enlightenment Now. Stephen Ponker. Wanted to read it, but it is so turgid. Uuuhhhghf
  • The Potlikker Papers, John T Edge. The book is fine, I'm just not that interested in the topic.
  • Travels with Herodotus, Ryszard Kapuscinski. Very good writing, but ultimately dull.
  • From Cold War to Hot Peace, an American Ambassador in Putin's Russia, Michael McFaul. Waaaaaaayyyyy too much detail and no big picture
  • What you're getting wrong about Appalachia, Elizabeth Catte. Undoubtedly she has some very strong points with which I would agree, but it is a book against another rather than about something. Also needs better editing.
  • Vagabonding. Rolf Potts. Politically adolescent and structurally patronizing
  • 12.5.18 The Son. Phillip Meyer. If it says 'epic family saga', it's too long by half and entirely unbelievable.
  • The Shadow of the Sun, Ryszard Kapuscinsky. It was fine, but very old and not quite engaging enough for an incredibly busy time in my life.
  • Umami, Laia Jufresa. I just don't care enough to try to track the identity of the deliberately obscured multiple narrators, so many you forget who they are.
  • Wallflower at the Orgy, Nora Ephron. A book complaining about people being trite that is, in itself, trite. I just don't care
  • Founding Gardeners. I have to give up on Andrea Wulf, she takes a great idea and makes it boring. In this case, failing to discuss slavery within the context is at best, bizarre and definately takes away from her basic premis
  • Cycling Home from Siberia, Rob Lilwall, fine (just) till he brought in Jesus and American know how. Had enough of that lately.
  • The Communist's daughter, Dennis Bock. Sooo grim!
2017
  • Dragon's Fire, Anne McCaffery and Todd McCaffery. So dark and not well written.
  • Chasing Venus, The race to measure the heavens. Andrea Wulf. Wanted to love it, but it was soooooo dull.
  • The Invention of Nature, Alexander Von Humbolt's New Nature. Wanted to love it. So badly. So depressing and still boring.
  • Artemis, Andy Weir. I thought the main character was a 14 year old boy. Nope, turns out SHE's a 25 year old. Shit writing, crap characters, uninteresting story.
  • A Coffin for Dimitrios, Eric Ambler. My husband loved it, it just didn't grab me.
  • Believe Me, Eddie Izzard. Terrible writing
  • I am Pilgrim, Terry Hayes. Too much very graphic violence

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