Sunday, November 28, 2010

Inspiration

Went off today to see this exhibition at the CCCB which was EXceptional.  I now have labyrinths on the brain... and ideas for how to make them, and make them work for us.  Hmmmmmmm.

There was a book all about fonts that set me off all over again on working with letters as forms themselves. On top of that I coughed up for a book about making books.  Not writing them, literally making them.  This is going to make the canvas a day project a little trickier to document.  Each little tiny book has a bunch of pages.  Hmmmm.

I think for Xmas I am going to ask for paper.  Lots and lots of different kinds of paper.

These three ideas, letters, labyrinths and books are cooking around and around in my head....

Two covers here, but the bulk of the mini-books will be off to the right there.


The cover of book #1



and # 2.

12 comments:

Kim said...

What a thrill to be so inspired! Love that feeling, that visceral, gut-like "ooh, I've got to do/explore/check-this-or-that-out/kind of stuff. I'm constantly amazed that there is still "stuff" that has been there for so long that I haven't yet explored myself. Yeah for life!

elpadawan said...

Very nice. Also, your use of the word "Labyrinth" made me wonder about the difference between "Maze" and "Labyrinth". Which I didn't know, but always wondered why sometimes people say maze and sometimes labyrinth. Knowing that difference now, shouldn't the english title for the exhibit have been about mazes instead? (french doesn't make the distinction between maze and labyrinth, it's always "labyrinthe")

Helen said...

How do you fit it all in?

kate said...

Oooh, gorgeous work! And yes, what a neat feeling to find something to chew on, get excited about it, and put it into practice! Right now I'm getting that feeling a lot as I research for my course design project, but I don't really have time to mull it all over.

oreneta said...

Kim! Indeed! YEAH for life!

ElP, I think of Labyrinth and maze as synonyms myself. According to Webster's maze was first written in the 14th c and according to the oxford originates in Middle English. Another source states it's earliest recorded use at 1250 − 1300. All call them synonyms. Labrynth, according to Oxford came into middle English from French, who got it from Latin who themselves adapted it from Greek. I suspect that maze was the older word used by the anglo-saxons and labyrinth the word imported by the French when they arrived in 1066. Now we have both. cool, no?

Helen, I don't work a 40 hour week, I have a 2 min commute and I work hard at it all.

Kate, Thank you! I'm glad you like the pieces. It is a wonderful feeling to have somewhere to go....glad you're enjoying what your researching too, there is so much you have to do, I'm glad it's enjoyable anyway.

J.G. said...

Man, you have talent to burn! Can't wait to see how the book thing comes out.

oreneta said...

Oh JG, you are so kind!

oreneta said...

Oh, and Helen, no TV.

Vancouver Isle Doug said...

Nice. My favorite is #3 pictured on the side. LOVE the colors!!!

oreneta said...

Thanks Doug!

elpadawan said...

I don't have a webster's. I actually looked at the wikipedia entry where apparently you are supposed to use one word or the other based on whether there are branches in it or if it's just a one-way thing where you turn, and turn, and turn, and end back up outside without knowing what happened.

oreneta said...

Labrynth is indeed the one way thing, that turns and turns and turns, and a maze has branches, but in common usage, they are synonyms. Webseter's has an excellent on-line dictionary, free, just type in webster's and Oxfords is at wordreference.com or at least it is associated with it, and wordreference is excellent.